PaintScratch Touch-Up Paint  ›  What to Order  ›  Painting An Entire (Jeep) Bumper Cover
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muzicman82
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Posted by: muzicman82 Posted on: October 9th, 2006, 4:56am

So, I have to replace the bumper cover on my '96 Jeep Grand Cherokee. It came gray. I purchased two cans of basecoat and two cans of clearcoat.

After finishing with the clearcoat, it was very textured and hazy. It made it very difficult to take rubbing compound to, and after I was done, in some areas, it took off clearcoat and paint. I did several light coats. Should I be doing heavier coats whereas they actually look wet and glossy?? I was probably too light to prevent running.

So, if I were to order more paint and clearcoat to do it correctly this time, how many spray cans should I need for this?

Also, I picked up some 3M Perfect It II Rubbing Compound and Meguiar's Swirl Remover 2.0. Are these not appropriate for these paints and clearcoats? I have no problem ordering the rubbing compound sold on-site, but it is a bit pricey.

PaintScratch.com directions are the only I've read that suggest rubbing compound directly after clearcoat, and to use it till you get a glossy shine. Is this an alternative to wet sanding? Which is better?

Posted by: admin Posted on: October 10th, 2006, 3:57pm
Reply: 1

Bulldog Adhesion Promoter
We recommend the use of Bulldog Adhesion Promoter if you are spraying a non-metal surfaces. After the area has been sanded smooth, apply a layer of Bulldog Adhesion Promoter to the entire surface you will be painting (including where you will be applying clearcoat). Follow this layer with primer, basecoat and clearcoat. The Bulldog will promote proper adhesion of the paint layers.


Spraying the Clearcoat
Spray the clear over the paint. Do not spray the clearcoat in the sun. Do not spray a part that has been heated by the sun. Let it cool down first, as otherwise the clearcoat will dry with a dull finish. Let the clearcoat dry thoroughly. If you let the clearcoat dry overnight, it will be dry. However, in temperatures less than 70 degrees, it can take much longer. If necessary, wet sand out any imperfections with 1000 grit, then apply a final coat of clear. Let the clearcoat dry for at least three days and then use our automotive rubbing compound to smooth and shine the area.

Spraying the Clearcoat-Technique
You would typically spray the clearcoat farther out than the paint to a boundary line on your vehicle. Again, you don't want to spray the clearcoat in the middle of a panel without going out to the edges as you will leave a noticeable clearcoat line.

Using the Rubbing Compound
The application of Rubbing compound creates the deep gloss in the clearcoat so don't skip this step!
Let the clearcoat dry for at least three days before using the rubbing compound. Do not use a heavy duty rubbing compound as it will dull the surface. Also, do not use polishing compound as this is not the same as rubbing compound. Use a medium duty rubbing compound like we sell on our site.

Use a clean, very soft cloth like an old tee shirt (for example DO NOT USE PAPER PRODUCTS as the wood fibers will scratch the paint!). Place a small quantity of rubbing compound on the vehicle and use circular strokes and apply even pressure to the vehicle. It's almost like waxing a vehicle except the rubbing compound is like an extremely fine liquid sandpaper. Buff with a clean cloth to a high gloss. (You may want to spray some paint and clearcoat on a smooth surface and practice to get the feel of it.)  Sometimes lots of pressure is required to make the clear shine. The rubbing compound can also be applied by machine, but careful, it's very easy to burn the paint! You can get the same results by hand, it will just take a bit longer.

Problems
Poor or no shine
1) You may have not applied enough clearcoat. If you have gone through the clearcoat, you will end up polishing the basecoat which will not shine! Solution-apply more clearcoat and compound the area again.
2) You are using polishing compound or heavy duty rubbing compound. The polishing compound will do nothing for the paint and the heavy duty compound will dull the finish. Solution-use a medium duty rubbing compound. You may have to apply more clearcoat.
3) You may have such a large area that trying to compound by hand is just too difficult. Solution-use a power buffer or hire a detail shop to compound the area. See the warning above about using a power buffer.
4) You have used paper cloth, have a dirty cloth, are using a terry cloth towel or a cloth with grit in it. Solution-use an old clean T-shirt.
5) You didn't apply any clearcoat! Don't laugh, but this has been a common problem. The basecoat will not shine no matter how much rubbing compound you apply. Solution-Apply clearcoat!
6) You have a whitish haze or white streaks through the clear. This is caused by high humidity conditions.  Solution-Wait until the humidity is under 50%. Scuff down the clearcoat, apply more color coat and reapply the clear.
7) You have spider veins through the paint. This is caused by either spraying the paint too far away or the temperature is too hot and the paint is drying before it hits the surface. Solution-Apply the paint closer to the surface and do not paint when the temperature is above 80 degrees.

The rubbing compound is also good for removing oxidation from your finish. Let the paint dry for a 30 days and apply a good quality automotive wax.

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